Research Progress
White Mold publication
White Mold is one of several recent NCSRP publications resulting from collaborative, multi-state research.

 

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Here are just a few of our successes over the years:

  • Characterized the genome of the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), one of the most important pests of soybean. With the newly-sequenced genome, researchers can now identify and monitor the nematode genes involved when SCN adapts to resistant varieties. An important milestone in the development of durable host resistance. .
  • Release of "Sporecaster" -- a smartphone application designed to help farmers predict the need for a fungicide application to control white mold in soybean.
  • Developed an economic threshold for the soybean aphid of 250 aphids/plant that economists estimate will save soybean producers more than $1.2 billion over the next five years.
  • Improvement in screening soybean varieties for resistance against sudden death syndrome, white mold, and soybean aphids.
  • Enabled the sequencing of the entire soybean aphid genome. This achievement will further advance our ability to identify soybean aphid genes responsible for overcoming resistant soybean.
  • Enabled scientists to build a “genetic library” of more than 300,000 pieces of genetic information used by public and private labs to decode the mysteries of the soybean defense mechanisms. Checkoff funding by NCSRP and the United Soybean Board leveraged more than $5 million in federal funding for this novel research program.
  • Coordinated an effective checkoff/university response to the arrival of soybean rust in the United States. Helped develop and distribute a unified set of management/response recommendations to U.S. soybean producers.
  • Founded the SCN Coalition, a visionary effort to deliver SCN-resistant varieties and SCN resistance management, involving seed companies, universities and checkoff partners. After a 20-year hiatus, the SCN Coalition is back, encouraging soybean farmers to “Take the test. Beat the pest.”

View current research projects and progress reports»